Convert blood sugar/glucose levels from mg/dL (US standard) to mmol/L (Canada and UK standard) and vice versa using our blood sugar converter.

mg/dL gives the concentration by the ratio of weight to volume, in this case milligrams per decilitre. mmol/L gives the molarity, which is the number of molecules of a substance within a specified volume, in this case within 1 litre.

mg/dL is the unit predominantly used in the USA and continental Europe, whereas Canada and the UK use mmol/L to measure blood glucose levels.

What’s the difference between mg/dL and mmol/L?

Both sets of units are used to measure blood sugar levels and both give a measurement of the concentration of glucose in the blood, albeit in slightly different ways.

mg/dL: Unit for measuring concentration of glucose in the blood in the USA – milligrams per decilitre.: Milligrams per 100 millilitres
Blood glucose typically varies from 70 mmol/dl to 130 mmol/dl for people without diabetes, according to the ADA

mmol/L: Millimoles per litre is the international standard unit for measuring the concentration of glucose in the blood – also known as millimolar (mM).

Blood sugar (also called blood glucose) needs to be tightly controlled in the human body to minimise the risk of complications developing.

Understanding blood sugar levels

Blood sugar (also called blood glucose) needs to be tightly controlled in the human body to minimise the risk of complications developing.

If your blood sugar levels remain higher than the target levels for long periods of time, you will be at greater risk of developing long term complications such as heart, kidney, nerve and retinal diseases.

If you are on insulin, sulfonylureas or prandial glucose regulators, it’s important that blood glucose levels do not go too low (going hypo) as this can present an immediate danger to health.